Watch LIVE as NOAA Explore Alaska’s Deep Waters

This sculpin was observed resting on a large red tree coral during a NOAA 2016 expedition in Glacier Bay National Park. Red tree corals have been shown to be the foundation of diverse deepwater communities in Alaska and are one of the types of corals we hope to see during the Seascape Alaska 3: Aleutians Remotely Operated Vehicle Exploration and Mapping expedition. Image courtesy of the Deepwater Exploration of Glacier Bay National Park expedition and UCONN-NURTEC

With its vast wilderness, diverse wildlife, stunning landscapes and rich cultural heritage, Alaska is a place of beauty and wonder. But did you know that the deep waters of Alaska hold their own secrets – from fascinating geological features like mud volcanoes and gas seeps to diverse and plentiful marine life, such as corals, sponges and fish? This summer, prepare to deepen your perspective and join us LIVE for an expedition to explore what lies below the ocean’s surface off Alaska.

Between July 15 and July 24, watch live as NOAA and partners explore deep waters off the Aleutian Islands with a remotely operated vehicle. This expedition, the third in a series of six “Seascape Alaska” expeditions being led by NOAA Ocean Exploration on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, marks the first time that NOAA is using telepresence technology to engage scientists and members of the public in dives off Alaska, meaning anyone with an internet connection – including you! – can watch the dives – LIVE.

Tune In

What: Remotely operated vehicle dives at depths ranging from approximately 300 to 5,800 meters (985 to 19,030 feet) off the Aleutian Islands.

When: All things permitting, dives will be streamed live daily, July 15 to July 24, from approximately 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. AK / 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. ET. Dates and times are subject to change.

Where to watch: NOAA Ocean Exploration website: https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/livestreams/welcome.html

Why: To watch (live) as we explore deep-sea coral and sponge habitats, gas seeps and fracture zones (and related geohazards), the water column and more.

Despite contributing the largest area to the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and playing a critical role in our nation’s economy and national security, Alaska deep waters remain one of the least explored areas in the United States. Less than 30% of the seafloor around Alaska has been mapped to modern standards and just a fraction of that has been visibly surveyed. Yet we know that Alaskan waters hold vast resources and wonders. Increasing our understanding of where these features and fauna are found; how they operate; and how they are connected to each other, to the greater Earth environment, and to us is critical to sustainably managing and protecting these areas.

NOAA Ocean Exploration’s 2023 Seascape Alaska expeditions will contribute to the National Strategy for Exploring, Mapping, and Characterizing the United States Exclusive Economic Zone, Seabed 2030, and the multipartner Seascape Alaska campaign.

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